Imaging of ancient Egyptian mummies' temporal bones with digital volume tomography.

Link:
Autor/in:
Erscheinungsjahr:
2012
Medientyp:
Text
Schlagworte:
  • Adult
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
  • Imaging, Three-Dimensional
  • History, Ancient
  • Tomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods
  • Egypt
  • Ear Ossicles/radiography
  • Mummies/*radiography
  • Semicircular Canals/radiography
  • Temporal Bone/*radiography
  • Tomography/*methods
  • Adult
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
  • Imaging, Three-Dimensional
  • History, Ancient
  • Tomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods
  • Egypt
  • Ear Ossicles/radiography
  • Mummies/*radiography
  • Semicircular Canals/radiography
  • Temporal Bone/*radiography
  • Tomography/*methods
Beschreibung:
  • The radiographic imaging of ancient Egyptian mummies has always been of great interest. Computed tomography is the method of choice to demonstrate bony pathologies with high quality. As digital volume tomography (DVT) is an extension of panoramic tomography with a very high resolution, its qualities were evaluated by examination of temporal bones of Egyptian mummy skulls. Ten Egyptian mummy skulls from the Zoological Collection Marburg, estimated 1,700-5,000 years of age, from Abydos, Philae, Theben-West and Sakkarah, were examined by DVT (3D Accuitomo, Morita, Japan). Through a rotation 360° of the X-ray source around the region of interest, a cylinder of 3 × 4 cm was captured as a three-dimensional volume. The gained data were analyzed with the help of special software on a PC. The angles of the axial, coronal and sagittal sections were arbitrarily changed to represent single structures with high resolution of 0.125 mm to analyze specific anatomical structures. In all skulls, conditions of the temporal bone and its anatomical structures were evaluated and normal as well as pathological findings evaluated in detail. The analysis of special landmarks such as the ossicular chain, cochlea, external, and internal auditory canal, facial nerve canal, and semicircular canals showed an intact ossicular chain in six temporal bones, while only isolated and dislocated ossicles were found in eight temporal bones. Besides one dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal in one temporal bone which might have led to vertigo and deafness at lifetime, all other findings were normal. Fragments of foreign bodies additionally found in the labyrinth, external ear canal and intracranially were attributed to postmortem damage. Digital volume tomography extends the imaging possibilities of CT for paleoradiological evaluation of temporal bones. With its high resolution, geometric accuracy, reconstruction capabilities, rapidness, and comparably low costs, even small bony pathologies are precisely demonstrated in a limited area. Investigations of larger numbers of specimen might reveal further details of ancient history for further interdisciplinary investigation of anthropologists, Egyptiologists, otolaryngologists, and radiologists.
  • The radiographic imaging of ancient Egyptian mummies has always been of great interest. Computed tomography is the method of choice to demonstrate bony pathologies with high quality. As digital volume tomography (DVT) is an extension of panoramic tomography with a very high resolution, its qualities were evaluated by examination of temporal bones of Egyptian mummy skulls. Ten Egyptian mummy skulls from the Zoological Collection Marburg, estimated 1,700-5,000 years of age, from Abydos, Philae, Theben-West and Sakkarah, were examined by DVT (3D Accuitomo, Morita, Japan). Through a rotation 360° of the X-ray source around the region of interest, a cylinder of 3 × 4 cm was captured as a three-dimensional volume. The gained data were analyzed with the help of special software on a PC. The angles of the axial, coronal and sagittal sections were arbitrarily changed to represent single structures with high resolution of 0.125 mm to analyze specific anatomical structures. In all skulls, conditions of the temporal bone and its anatomical structures were evaluated and normal as well as pathological findings evaluated in detail. The analysis of special landmarks such as the ossicular chain, cochlea, external, and internal auditory canal, facial nerve canal, and semicircular canals showed an intact ossicular chain in six temporal bones, while only isolated and dislocated ossicles were found in eight temporal bones. Besides one dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal in one temporal bone which might have led to vertigo and deafness at lifetime, all other findings were normal. Fragments of foreign bodies additionally found in the labyrinth, external ear canal and intracranially were attributed to postmortem damage. Digital volume tomography extends the imaging possibilities of CT for paleoradiological evaluation of temporal bones. With its high resolution, geometric accuracy, reconstruction capabilities, rapidness, and comparably low costs, even small bony pathologies are precisely demonstrated in a limited area. Investigations of larger numbers of specimen might reveal further details of ancient history for further interdisciplinary investigation of anthropologists, Egyptiologists, otolaryngologists, and radiologists.
Lizenz:
  • info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess
Quellsystem:
Forschungsinformationssystem des UKE

Interne Metadaten
Quelldatensatz
oai:pure.atira.dk:publications/eaa1e79d-dae4-4af7-86b4-cf7041f0c34d