Blister-like aneurysms--a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

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Autor/in:
Erscheinungsjahr:
2011
Medientyp:
Text
Schlagworte:
  • Adult
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Middle Aged
  • Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • Postoperative Care
  • Carotid Artery Diseases/*diagnosis/*therapy
  • Carotid Artery, Internal/surgery
  • Cerebral Angiography
  • Endovascular Procedures/methods
  • Headache/etiology
  • Intracranial Aneurysm/*diagnosis/*therapy
  • Nausea/etiology
  • Neurosurgical Procedures/methods
  • Vomiting/etiology
  • Adult
  • Humans
  • Female
  • Middle Aged
  • Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • Postoperative Care
  • Carotid Artery Diseases/*diagnosis/*therapy
  • Carotid Artery, Internal/surgery
  • Cerebral Angiography
  • Endovascular Procedures/methods
  • Headache/etiology
  • Intracranial Aneurysm/*diagnosis/*therapy
  • Nausea/etiology
  • Neurosurgical Procedures/methods
  • Vomiting/etiology
Beschreibung:
  • Blister-like internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms are known for their fragile and thin-walled morphology associated with a high risk of intraprocedural rupture. Neurosurgical and endovascular options are illustrated on three exemplary cases reviewing the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these special aneurysms. A 49-year-old woman was admitted with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in which angiography showed a broad-based, small bulging ectasy of the terminal ICA segment. On the attempt of surgical clipping, the aneurysm ruptured leaving a tear in the ICA. After temporary clipping, the rims of the tear were approximated by sutures. Sufficient closure of the remaining leakage was achieved by circumferential wrapping which was secured by two clips. Postoperative angiography confirmed stenosis of the tightened ICA and patient recovered without neurological deficit. Surgical attempt on a second case with bulging of the C4-segment topped by a small aneurysm was fatal due to extensive laceration of the basal ICA intraoperatively. Endovascular stenting was the choice of treatment in a third SAH patient in which angiography was suspicious of a blister-like ICA aneurysm. Six-month follow-up was uneventful; the patient recovered well and further growth of bulging was not seen. Reviewing the literature, blister-like aneurysms tend to arise at uncommon sites not located at the arterial branches. Small and broad-based bulges with or without true saccular aneurysms have to be assessed as characteristic features of blister-like aneurysms. Rupture of the aneurysm involving the carrying artery has to be considered during therapeutic attempts, in which urgent strategies have to be kept in reserve preventing fatal outcome. Blister-like aneurysms is a hazardous affair for neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists as their fragile structure most likely will lead to intraoperative rupture. If endovascular treatment is not promising, wrapping and revascularization techniques come true to still be an important part of the neurosurgeons toolbox for reconstructing a vessel lumen and preserving a sufficient cerebral blood flow.
  • Blister-like internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms are known for their fragile and thin-walled morphology associated with a high risk of intraprocedural rupture. Neurosurgical and endovascular options are illustrated on three exemplary cases reviewing the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these special aneurysms. A 49-year-old woman was admitted with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in which angiography showed a broad-based, small bulging ectasy of the terminal ICA segment. On the attempt of surgical clipping, the aneurysm ruptured leaving a tear in the ICA. After temporary clipping, the rims of the tear were approximated by sutures. Sufficient closure of the remaining leakage was achieved by circumferential wrapping which was secured by two clips. Postoperative angiography confirmed stenosis of the tightened ICA and patient recovered without neurological deficit. Surgical attempt on a second case with bulging of the C4-segment topped by a small aneurysm was fatal due to extensive laceration of the basal ICA intraoperatively. Endovascular stenting was the choice of treatment in a third SAH patient in which angiography was suspicious of a blister-like ICA aneurysm. Six-month follow-up was uneventful; the patient recovered well and further growth of bulging was not seen. Reviewing the literature, blister-like aneurysms tend to arise at uncommon sites not located at the arterial branches. Small and broad-based bulges with or without true saccular aneurysms have to be assessed as characteristic features of blister-like aneurysms. Rupture of the aneurysm involving the carrying artery has to be considered during therapeutic attempts, in which urgent strategies have to be kept in reserve preventing fatal outcome. Blister-like aneurysms is a hazardous affair for neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists as their fragile structure most likely will lead to intraoperative rupture. If endovascular treatment is not promising, wrapping and revascularization techniques come true to still be an important part of the neurosurgeons toolbox for reconstructing a vessel lumen and preserving a sufficient cerebral blood flow.
Lizenz:
  • info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess
Quellsystem:
Forschungsinformationssystem des UKE

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oai:pure.atira.dk:publications/2a4da1f5-d0ae-4962-b27c-2b1c9f0d502f